The paper should be outlined as follows: Explanation of the key policy challenge and its local manifestation; your research questions; your findings; an evaluation of the steps taken so far by officials and community members to address this issue; what leadership approach(es) you recommend using (e.g., path goal, transformational, etc.) and why; a practical implementation plan (e.g., how you would coalesce a group around this issue); and possible objections to your plan and how to address them.

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Future Challenges Bibliography

Future Challenges Bibliography: Resource management

Ingold, K., Fischer, M., de Boer, C., & Mollinga, P. P. (2016). Water Management across Borders, Scales and Sectors: Recent developments and future challenges in water policy analysis. Environmental policy and governance, 26(4), 223-228. https://doi.org/10.1002/eet.1713

           Ingold et al., 2016 embarked on a study focused on an integrated water resource management system. The authors seek to ascertain how policies affect the initiation of IWRM (integrated water resource management. Besides water policies (regional, national and Transboundary), an effective water resource management demands an appropriate design, regulations and empirical strategies. The article cites that a collaborative approach from all stakeholders influences integration in water management. Ingold et al., 2016 aver that geographical scales such a jurisdictional, catchment and sub-catchment determine the exploration and management of water. Politics always impact the integration and sustainability of water resources. The degree of water development and infrastructure can heighten or lag, depending on water regulations (multilevel and Transboundary policies). Conversely, the authors aver that an effective integrated water management system can be attained by being cognizant of environmental policies, engaging stakeholders, local government participation and stirring workable institutional changes.

Seelen, L. M., Flaim, G., Jennings, E., & Domis, L. N. D. S. (2019). Saving water for the future: Public awareness of water usage and water quality. Journal of environmental management242, 246-257. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2019.04.047

           The journal coins that water is a limited resource. The average consumption of water in Europe is 3550l per capita per day, yet the statistics keep on rising. Even though water-saving measures are implemented, water saved is not sustainable. Seelen, (2019), back the idea of educating the masses about justifiable water use and threats that affect the quality of water. Communities can participate in citizen science projects to be imparted with water knowledge and ways of maintaining its quality. Moreover, Directive legislation, water managers, environmental and scientific literacy helps in the conservation of water which is a limited resource. The article alludes that sustainability of the limited resource use is achieved by not only cutting personal freshwater usage but also improving the quality of surface water.

Butler, D., Ward, S., Sweetapple, C., AstaraieImani, M., Diao, K., Farmani, R., & Fu, G. (2017). Reliable, resilient and sustainable water management: the Safe & SuRe approach. Global Challenges1(1), 63-77. https://doi.org/10.1002/gch2.1010

           Butler, (2017), words that sustainability of water provision and its management is deterred by urbanization, growing population, environmental degradation and climate change. The researchers back the development of mitigation and adaptation measures/strategies for reliable, resilient and sustainable management of water. a paradigm shift in water management would necessitate empirical studies, conventional planning, providing technical solutions, embracing new ideas and technology, finding water-saving mechanisms and improving water infrastructures. 

Wang, H., Mei, C., Liu, J., & Shao, W. (2018). A new strategy for integrated urban water management in China: Sponge city. Science China Technological Sciences61(3), 317-329.https://doi.org/10.1007/s11431-017-9170-5

           The authors anticipate an increase in urban water-related problems if cities do not initiate new water management technologies. Wang (2018), say that issues like water degradation, pollution, waterlogging and urbanization will keep on increasing if there are no regulations, plans and technologies to manage water resources. China is illustrated as a pioneer country to assimilate an integrated urban water management system. The system is regarded as holistic because it counters water-related concerns such as supply, degradation, and recycling. For effective implementation of sponge city (integrated urban water management system), contemporary technologies, intensive studies/researches, public participation, development directions and stepwise execution of Sponge City Programme are needed.

References

Butler, D., Ward, S., Sweetapple, C., Astaraie‐Imani, M., Diao, K., Farmani, R., & Fu, G. (2017). Reliable, resilient and sustainable water management: the Safe & SuRe approach. Global Challenges1(1), 63-77. https://doi.org/10.1002/gch2.1010

Ingold, K., Fischer, M., de Boer, C., & Mollinga, P. P. (2016). Water Management across Borders, Scales and Sectors: Recent developments and future challenges in water policy analysis. Environmental policy and governance, 26(4), 223-228. https://doi.org/10.1002/eet.1713

Seelen, L. M., Flaim, G., Jennings, E., & Domis, L. N. D. S. (2019). Saving water for the future: Public awareness of water usage and water quality. Journal of environmental management242, 246-257. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2019.04.047

Wang, H., Mei, C., Liu, J., & Shao, W. (2018). A new strategy for integrated urban water management in China: Sponge city. Science China Technological Sciences61(3), 317-329.https://doi.org/10.1007/s11431-017-9170-5

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