Scripting Belief sample essay

Authors in the chapter “How We Believe” suggest that our popular culture scripts not only our behavior but our underlying beliefs as well. Write an essay in which you analyze and assess (evaluate) this idea. Do you think it’s possible to have our beliefs—the ideas and values that are supposedly intrinsic and personal—scripted by our larger culture? If so, how do you think this process happens? And if not, what is it about our personal beliefs that make them resistant to being molded and shaped this way?

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Introduction

People tend to think that personal belief is something that exclusively belongs to them. This thinking would mean that a person’s values, ethics, and priorities are free from the influence of the broader culture. A person who holds this view aims to reaffirm his or her faith in his or her agency. This view relates to subjective truth about the belief system (Miller 13). Subjective thinking considers eternal happiness as an absolute good that is achieved by faith. However, popular culture influences people’s behaviors and beliefs in that they do everything that they are convinced to be true simply because it feels right.

Do you think it’s possible to have our beliefs—the ideas and values that are supposedly intrinsic and personal—scripted by our larger culture?

It is not possible to possess beliefs that are free from the influence of the larger culture. Beliefs are not wild guesses about what people say they believe. A belief encompasses almost everything in a person’s life that he or she is convinced to be true simply because it feels right. It is tricky for a person to defend their beliefs because they cannot prove the validity of the beliefs. People are neither good nor bad, but were all born innocent. Society and environment can be blamed for the nature of the behaviors of individuals. For instance, the environment shapes an individual’s behavior and beliefs (Miller 15). The society has the responsibility of nurturing good values to its people.  In analyzing human behavior, it is crucial to look at the relationships as well as interactions which a person has regarding their intermediate environments such as family and school.

If so, how do you think this process happens?

People live in a world that promotes very specific messages regarding what is right and what is wrong. This world is characterized with countless instructions that tell people what should do and care about (Miller 13). The cultural landscape where people live is filled with sources that tell them, usually in a very authoritative tone, what matters and what does not matter. As such, belief is, therefore, more than an issue of personal choice. Belief touches upon the ways that people’s values can be scripted and normalized by the larger culture.

For instance, organizational culture shapes the behaviors of employees and other individuals working for it. An organization can reinforce behaviors that it wants and resist from reinforcing behavior which it does not wish to. For instance, the organization can reinforce the behavior which it intends to continue. It is essential, however, for organizations to be mindful of the actions they want to strengthen and the behaviors which they do not want to enhance. As such, ethical behavior needs to be reinforced so that it may continue to take place. However, problematic unethical behaviors should not be reinforced since such behaviors are not desirable in the organization. Ethical behaviors in the organization can be enhanced by providing opportunities for recognition, awards, as well as social reinforcements.

Conclusion

Popular culture influences people’s behaviors and beliefs in that they do everything that they are convinced to be true simply because it feels right. A belief encompasses almost everything in a person’s life that he or she is convinced to be true only because it feels right. People live in a world that promotes particular messages regarding what is right and what is wrong.

Work Cited

Miller, James S. Acting Out Culture: Reading and Writing. London, United Kingdom:       Macmillan, 2008.